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Internet Explorer privacy—Do Not Track requests FAQ

  • When you visit a website in any browser, you automatically share information with that website, such as cookies, your IP address, and other standard device information. If the website contains content provided by a third-party website (for example a map, advertisement, or web measurement tools such as a web beacon or scripts), some of this information may also be automatically sent to that content provider. Although this activity can have several benefits—including facilitating ad-supported content on free websites—there are also potential privacy impacts because it may be possible for the content providers to track you across multiple websites. If you choose, Internet Explorer can send a Do Not Track (DNT) request to the websites you visit and to the third parties whose content is hosted on those sites. The request, however, is simply a signal to those websites. Internet Explorer can't enforce the request. Websites may respect the signal or may continue to engage in activities you might view as tracking. For more information, please review the "Internet Explorer Mobile" section of the Windows Phone 8.1 Privacy Statement. You can also find more information at Change privacy and other browser settings.

  • When you turn on Do Not Track, Internet Explorer attaches a specific kind of header to your browsing signals. This DNT request is delivered to the websites you visit and to the third parties whose content is hosted on those sites.

  • Yes. The DNT request is simply a signal. Internet Explorer can't enforce the request. Websites may respect the signal or may continue to engage in activities you might view as tracking. How a website chooses to comply with DNT requests will depend on the website's specific practices. As we announced in February 2012, Microsoft Advertising intends to treat the DNT browser signal as an opt-out of behavioral advertising under the Digital Advertising Alliance's self-regulatory program. Microsoft does not yet respond to the DNT signal, but we are actively working with other advertising industry leaders on what an implementation plan for DNT might look like.

  • Currently there's no universally agreed-upon definition of how to respond to a DNT signal. How a website chooses to comply with your preferences will depend on the website's specific practices. For information about how the DNT requests affect the operations of the websites you visit, you'll need to review the sites' privacy policies and other disclosures.

  • No. Internet Explorer Mobile doesn't currently support tracking protection lists like those used in Internet Explorer 9 and 10.

  • You choose whether to send DNT requests as you browse. You can send the requests by choosing the recommended settings the first time you use Internet Explorer. You can also turn the setting on or off at any time:

    1. In the App list, tap Settings Settings icon, flick left to Applications, tap Internet Explorer, and then tap Advanced settings.

    2. Select or clear the Send a Do Not Track request to websites you visit check box.

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